Developer Advice for CouchDB Newcomers – Part 2

In case you’re new to CouchDB, the CouchDB Developer interviews have offered us some great advice to share with CouchDB newcomers.

In a previous newcomer post, we discussed the value of connection, experimentation, and having fun, as well as some specific advice from Nick Vatamaniuc,  Glynn Bird, Paul Davis, and Joan Touzet.

As we continued our interviews, some more advice came by way of Garren Smith when he shared that if you are coming from the SQL world, CouchDB could be a little daunting, since it requires a bit of a mind shift in how you store and retrieve your data. It’s a good idea to first understand the concept of a document-orientated database before diving in completely. Start with the basics, use Mango for querying, and then add a dash of PouchDB for maximum enjoyment.

Nolan Lawson, a co-maintainer of PouchDB shared that PouchDB makes it trivially easy to sync between CouchDB on the server and IndexedDB, WebSQL, or LevelDB on the client. He credited much of this to how well thought out CouchDB is as a whole. Nolan added that there are other tools he find useful like Postman which is a neat tool for debugging HTTP APIs and of course the classic backup tool for CouchDB called cp (i.e., just copy the .couch file). 
 
When prompted to give advice, Nick Vatamaniuc encourages newcomers to learn about _bulk_docs API endpoint to insert multiple documents at the same time, saying it is often a good way to improve insert performance. Additionally, he encourages everyone to learn about change feeds and use them to create more responsive and dynamic applications.

Michelle Phung stated that CouchDB was certainly a new way of thinking for her, acknowledging that although there was a learning curve, it was really interesting and also, it was pretty amazing to make stuff that will help people in the world. We could not agree more.

We really appreciate all the advice that has been provided by CouchDB Developers and find it important to express that everyone was a beginner at one time or another.

Please consider joining the fun, if there’s content you’d like to contribute or something you’d like to see covered on the CouchDB blog, we would love to accommodate. Email us!

For more about CouchDB visit couchdb.org or follow us on Twitter at @couchdb

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